Books

by Max Brooks ‧ RELEASE DATE: June 16, 2020 Are we not men? We are—well, ask Bigfoot, as Brooks does in this delightful yarn, following on his bestseller World War Z (2006). A zombie apocalypse is one thing. A volcanic eruption is quite another, for, as the journalist who does a framing voice-over narration for
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Narrator, author, and popular historian David McCullough died this past Sunday at his home in Hingham, Massachusetts. Before passing away at 89, millions knew McCullough as an award-winning author and TV host. McCullough’s writings were greatly celebrated, winning him Pulitzer Prizes for his biographies of two U.S. presidents— for Truman in 1992 and for John
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Hello, friends!!!! (Follow my lead.) Can’t wait to discuss this month’s book club book! The reason for the season, the thing that brings us together today (Princess Bride voice). You know, before we get started, I just want to say how much it means to me that literature brings us all together every single month.
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Alexis Hall leaps from the world of contemporary romantic comedies to the realm of Regency romance with A Lady for a Duke (15.5 hours). Justin de Vere, the Duke of Gracewood, has been moping around his family’s country estate ever since his closest friend died at the Battle of Waterloo. What Gracewood doesn’t realize is
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by Colleen Hoover ‧ RELEASE DATE: Jan. 18, 2022 After being released from prison, a young woman tries to reconnect with her 5-year-old daughter despite having killed the girl’s father. Kenna didn’t even know she was pregnant until after she was sent to prison for murdering her boyfriend, Scotty. When her baby girl, Diem, was
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THE TRUE STORY OF ROBERT GODDARD, THE FATHER OF US ROCKETRY by Kristen Fulton ; illustrated by Diego Funck ‧ RELEASE DATE: July 3, 2018 Punctuated—unsurprisingly—by explosions, an account of the groundbreaking rocketeer’s childhood and first experiments. Fueled by an early interest in hands-on science nurtured by his parents and sparked by reading The War
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Portal fantasies – fantasy stories that involve hopping from one high-concept magical universe to another, usually through a specific mechanism that allows the characters to travel between worlds – have been popular throughout the history of the genre. Portal fantasies arguably predate the novel form itself; legends about travels between the Nine Realms in Viking
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I like to consider myself a curious person. I always want to know how things work, who did this thing, and why that happened. What I’m not always great about is the follow-/ through. Sometimes I look at a prose nonfiction book about a topic and think maybe I should just read the Wikipedia article
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A child who likes to count meets a new classmate who likes to draw. What could they possibly have in common? In this sparely told and illustrated episode, Leo, depicted with Asian features, walks to school counting: one flower, two trees, three squirrels, five steps, eight new classmates, 13 raindrops on the window, and so
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by Chris Van Dusen ; illustrated by Chris Van Dusen ‧ RELEASE DATE: Aug. 13, 2019 A young visionary describes his ideal school: “Perfectly planned and impeccably clean. / On a scale, 1 to 10, it’s more like 15!” In keeping with the self-indulgently fanciful lines of If I Built a Car (2005) and If
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Warner Bros.’ Batgirl movie has officially been canceled. It was originally approved in 2021 as the studio was making efforts to make more movies for HBO Max, but now it won’t even show on the streaming service. The decision to forego releasing the movie— which starred Leslie Grace, J.K. Simmons, and Michael Keaton— comes not
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by Max Brooks ‧ RELEASE DATE: June 16, 2020 Are we not men? We are—well, ask Bigfoot, as Brooks does in this delightful yarn, following on his bestseller World War Z (2006). A zombie apocalypse is one thing. A volcanic eruption is quite another, for, as the journalist who does a framing voice-over narration for
0 Comments